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MRS. LAYLA MINOR
7TH, 8TH, 9TH GRADE ENGLISH
APPALACHIAN HIGH SCHOOL
ONEONTA,   AL   35121
SchoolNotes last updated: Mon Oct 17 09:35:15 CDT 2005    Number of Visits: 739
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Mrs. Minor's English Classes

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Course of Study
Seventh Ė Eighth Grade

Seventh Ė Eighth Grade
Overview

Student Characteristics

Students in Grades 6-8 display a wide range of intellectual abilities, learning styles, talents, interests, and maturation levels.  These students are going through a transitional period that includes physical, social, emotional, and intellectual changes. They have the ability to think on higher levels and to draw conclusions, and they possess a curiosity about the world.  They are beginning to personalize language and to use it more proficiently.  They become aware of the practical value of language.  During this period, students search for their own identity.  They are becoming more independent of parents and teachers and more dependent on peers for approval.

Instructional Environment

Reading, listening, viewing, writing, speaking, and presenting are studied as related skills in meaningful contexts.  Language study is kept relevant for students.  They make some choices about topics for writing and speaking.  Self-selection of literature and writing topics gives students responsibility for their own language learning.  Grammar, spelling, and vocabulary study are taught in the meaningful context of student writings and oral presentations.  Students interact with many literary genres using selections that are relevant to their lives and their studies in other content areas.

Scope of Content

The content standards address all areas of comprehension and expression:  reading, listening, viewing, writing, speaking, and presenting.  Through reading, students build understanding and acquire new information.  They also read for enjoyment and recreation as they develop a greater appreciation of literature.  By listening, students evaluate oral language and interact effectively with others.  Viewing helps them learn to interpret a variety of media and to become more discriminating processors of information.  Students use writing to communicate; to acquire new concepts; to reflect on their own thoughts and experiences; and to respond to what they read, hear, and view.  Students speak to communicate, to interact with others, to articulate ideas, and to react to what they have read, heard, and viewed.  By making presentations, students create and communicate ideas and information through a variety of media.

Literature

The classrooms are filled with assorted reading materials:  trade books, peer writings, and multicultural selections from recognized traditional and contemporary authors.  Students learn how to choose reading materials of quality.  Students make choices and decisions about reading and writing that will contribute to the appreciation and enjoyment of varied reading materials throughout their lives.  Introducing students to a variety of recognized authors of diverse cultures helps them develop a respect for cultural differences.  It also allows them to see, to use, and to refine different language structures and models.  Through reading, writing, viewing, and discussing, students recognize that literary themes reflect life.


Seventh Grade


Seventh-grade students experience a wide range of physical and emotional changes.  Their curiosity about the world motivates them to search for meaning through language and literature.  In responding to literature, students expand their skills and knowledge as they make responsible decisions regarding their reading, viewing, and studying.  They enhance their reading, listening, and viewing skills as they increase awareness of their environment.  

They also develop their personal adaptations of the writing process and presentation styles.  This adaptation and personalization of processes are significant characteristics of the students and their curriculum.  They adapt their writing process to meet their own needs as authors.  They also develop their own speaking, presenting, and writing styles; identify their best studying methods; and recognize and express their reading and viewing preferences.

MINIMUM REQUIRED CONTENT

Students will

1.    Construct, interpret, and evaluate meaning by applying appropriate strategies to materials across the curriculum.
    

Examples:    setting purposes for reading, interpreting authorís meaning, using monitoring strategies, correcting or confirming authorís message, distinguishing fact from opinion, determining cause and effect, noting sequence of events, identifying main idea and supporting details

2.    Read with ease textual, functional, and recreational materials encountered in daily life.    

Examples:    textbooks, trade books, magazines, newspapers, computer materials, written correspondence, school and community rules and laws, directions

3.    Exhibit the habit of reading for a substantial amount of time daily, including assigned and self-selected materials at their independent and instructional levels.    

4.    Demonstrate reading improvement gained through substantial amounts of daily reading.

5.    Recognize various forms of literature according to characteristics.

Examples:    poetry, short stories, novels, plays, folktales, myths, nonfiction

6.    Determine the authorís purpose by identifying the mode of writing.
∑    Narrative
∑    Descriptive
∑    Expository
∑    Persuasive

7.    Appreciate the characteristics, literary elements, and cultural influences of literary works representative of various eras.
    

Examples:    reading books and plays, listening to presentations, participating in productions, viewing movie and television productions

8.    Identify writing and speaking styles that incorporate dialects, idioms, and intonation patterns.

9.    Demonstrate respect for linguistic and cultural diversity in literature.
    
∑    Geographic
∑    Ethnic

10.    Identify components of the etymology of language.
    
∑    Word origins
∑    Cultural/regional expressions
∑    Country of orig11.    Refine general listening behaviors.
    
∑    Identifying main idea and summarizing
∑    Understanding contextual meaning of words used
∑    Listening for implications of significant details
∑    Understanding relationships among ideas
∑    Connecting spoken message to prior experiences

    12.    Select and indicate preference for sources of information.
    
Examples:    magazines, Internet, videotapes, how-to books and videos

    13.    Use study processes to manage information.
    
Examples:    taking notes; summarizing; organizing, questioning, and retaining information

    14.    Conduct project research, individually and collaboratively, utilizing all aspects of the research process.
    

∑    Locating and using multiple sources
Examples:    retrieving, selecting, evaluating
∑    Fulfilling a variety of purposes
Examples:    personal research, content-area research
∑    Documenting
Example:    correct use of copyrighted material
∑    Presenting findings
Examples:    written reports, projects

    15.    Respond with understanding and empathy to information read, viewed, and heard.

Examples:    large- and small-group discussions, student journals

        16.    Develop and use an extended vocabulary through reading, listening, viewing, writing, speaking, and presenting.
    

∑    Synonyms
∑    Antonyms
∑    Affixes and base words
∑    Classifications
∑    Context clues
∑    Denotation and connotation

        17.    Use available computer technology to enhance reading and writing skills.

Examples:    word processing programs, multimedia presentations, Internet

    18.    Present literature and personal composition effectively.
    
Examples:    Readerís Theatre, choral speaking, oral interpretation

    19.    Identify ways the power of language evokes emotion; expands thinking; and influences problem solving, decision making, and action.
    

    20.    Demonstrate effective listening and speaking behaviors for varied situations and purposes.

∑    Interpersonal situations
Examples:    taking turns, asking questions, adjusting proximity to
other person
∑    Group discussions
Examples:    taking turns, asking questions, noting facial expressions, attending to speakers
∑    Public speaking
Examples:    audience awareness, posture, gestures

        21.    Exhibit proficiency in the use of the writing process.

∑    Prewriting
Examples:    choosing a topic, group and/or individual brainstorming
∑    Drafting
Example:    focusing on purpose and audience
∑    Revising
Example:    reorganizing sentences
∑    Editing*
Example:    making needed corrections
∑    Publishing
Example:    constructing books

        22.    Know and apply principles of grammar and usage in writing, speaking, and presenting and apply mechanics in writing.

∑    Capitalization
-    Proper nouns and adjectives
-    Regions of country
-    Titles of people, books, and works of art
-    First word in quotations
∑    Punctuation
-    Comma(s) with appositives, with introductory elements, and before coordinate conjunction in compound sentence
-    Colon to introduce a list
-    Quotation marks and commas with direct quotations
-    Semicolon between independent clauses with no conjunction
-    Apostrophe for possession and contractions
∑    Grammar, usage, and spelling
-    Adverb and adjective forms
-    Noun and verb forms
-    Appropriate tenses including present, past, future, and perfect tenses
-    Subject-verb agreement including intervening phrase
-    Pronoun-antecedent agreement
-    Pronoun case
-    Special usage problems
Examples:    double negatives, homonym confusion
-    Parts of speech
-    Developing compound and complex sentences
-    Avoiding redundancy, fragments, run-ons, and on-and-on sentences

    23.    Compose using recognized literature as models.

24.    Use self-monitoring and feedback from peers and teachers to evaluate reading, writing, listening, viewing, studying, and research skills.
    

Examples:    portfolios, journals, rubrics, student checklists


*See content standard 22 for specific concepts.

25.    Organize content of written composition with attention to basic characteristics.
    
∑    Topic sentence
∑    Supporting sentences
∑    Purpose and audience
∑    Sentence combining and coherence

26.     Compose descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive essays.

27.    Compose and present in many ways using different techniques for various audiences and occasions both formal and informal.
    

Examples:    speeches, poems, social notes, forms, spontaneous response writing

28.    Express personal feelings, opinions, and information in formal and informal situations.
    

Examples:    conversations, written communications, interviews, public speaking


Eighth Grade


Eighth-graders increase their capability to synthesize prior knowledge with new information.  They need frequent opportunities to develop this capacity through reading, writing, discussing, and giving oral reports.  Students are now inclined to interact personally with language and literature.  As students become more experienced in revising and editing, they master additional grammatical principles and conventions of usage.  Even at the end of this grade level, they are continuing to develop the academic self-confidence needed to meet the challenges of the senior high grades.

Students benefit from the teacherís increased efforts to coordinate instruction with teachers of other subject areas so the students see relationships among content areas and various processes.  They become increasingly aware of the need for good writing skills in science, math, and social studies.  They also benefit from explicit instruction in common structural characteristics of text in the various content areas.

MINIMUM REQUIRED CONTENT

Students will

1.    Apply appropriate strategies to materials across the curriculum to construct meaning through interpretation and evaluation.
    

Examples:    using monitoring strategies, correcting or confirming authorís message, distinguishing fact from opinion, confirming authorís credentials, confirming intention and validity of message, using context clues, drawing conclusions, determining cause and effect, determining sequence of events, identifying main idea and supporting details

2.    Read with ease textual, functional, and recreational materials encountered in daily life.

Examples:    textbooks, trade books, magazines, newspapers, computer materials, written correspondence, laws and rules, directions

3.    Exhibit the habit of reading for a substantial amount of time daily, including assigned and self-selected materials at their independent and instructional levels.

4.    Demonstrate reading improvement gained through substantial amounts of daily reading.

5.    Distinguish various forms of literature according to characteristics.
    
Examples:    poetry, short stories, novels, plays, folktales, myths, epics, nonfiction, science fiction


6.    Determine the authorís purpose.
∑    To persuade
∑    To inform
∑    To entertain
∑    To evaluate

7.    Value recognized written, spoken, and visual works of literature representative of various cultures and eras.
    
8.    Appreciate writing and speaking styles that incorporate dialects, idioms, and intonation patterns.
    

9.    Analyze the etymology of language.
    
∑    Word origins
∑    Cultural and regional expressions
∑    Country of origin

10.    Demonstrate an appreciation for the power of language as it evokes emotion; expands thinking; and influences problem solving, decision making, and action.

Examples:    literary response journals, spontaneous response writings

11.    Demonstrate active listening and speaking behaviors related to effective oral communication in a number of situations for various purposes.
    

∑    Interpersonal situations
Example:    appropriate language use and tone of voice
∑    Group discussions
Example:    appropriate language use, posture, and gestures
∑    Public speaking
Examples:    message organization, facial expressions, eye contact

12.    Select and indicate preference for sources of information.
    
Examples:    magazines, Internet, novels, videotaped dramas, biographies, documentaries, how-to books and videos

13.    Use study processes to manage information.

Examples:    organizing, questioning, summarizing, and retaining information

14.    Conduct individual research utilizing all aspects of the research process.
    
∑    Information management
Examples:    locating, selecting, retrieving, evaluating
∑    Information documentation
Example:    correct use of copyrighted material
∑    Information organization
Example:    presentation method
∑    Presentation of findings
Examples:    formal written reports, projects

15.    Critique with understanding and empathy information read, viewed, and heard.    
Examples:    panel discussions, book and movie reviews

16.    Comprehend and display an extended vocabulary through reading, listening, viewing, writing, speaking, and presenting.
    

∑    Synonyms
∑    Antonyms
∑    Affixes and base words
∑    Classifications
∑    Context clues
∑    Denotation and connotation

17.    Use available computer technology to enhance reading and writing skills.
    
Examples:    editing programs, Internet

18.    Demonstrate effective listening and speaking behaviors for varied situations and purposes.
    

∑    Interpersonal situations
Examples:    taking turns, asking questions, adjusting proximity to
other person
∑    Group discussions
Examples:    taking turns, asking questions, noting facial expressions
∑    Public speaking
Examples:    audience awareness, posture, gestures


19.    Internalize the writing process.
    
∑    Prewriting
Example:    using a graphic organizer to determine the breadth of a topic
∑    Drafting
Example:    focusing on content
∑    Revising
Example:    reordering paragraphs
∑    Editing*
Example:    making needed corrections
∑    Publishing
Example:    printing in literary magazines

20.    Know and apply principles of grammar and usage in writing, speaking, and presenting and apply mechanics in writing.

∑    Capitalization
-    Proper nouns and adjectives
-    Regions of country
-    Titles of people, books, paintings, films, and ships
-    First word in quotations
∑    Punctuation
-    Comma(s) to set off nonessential appositives
-    Comma with introductory elements and direct quotations
-    Comma before coordinate conjunction in compound sentence
-    Colon to introduce a list
-    Quotation marks with direct quotations
-    Semicolon between independent clauses with no conjunction
-    Apostrophe for possession and contractions
∑    Grammar, usage, and spelling
-    Adverb and adjective forms
-    Noun and verb forms
-    Appropriate tense (avoiding shifts, all tenses)
-    Subject-verb agreement
-    Pronoun-antecedent agreement
-    Pronoun case
-    Special usage problems
Examples:    double negatives, homonym confusion
-    Parts of speech
-    Variety and precision in word choice
-    Developing compound and complex sentences
-    Avoiding redundancy, fragments, run-ons, and on-and-on sentences

21.    Compose using recognized literature as models.
    

*See content standard 20 for specific concepts.

22.    Use self-monitoring and feedback from peers and teachers to evaluate reading, writing, listening, viewing, studying, and research skills.    

Examples:    portfolios, journals, rubrics, student checklists

23.    Organize content of written composition with attention to basic characteristics.
    
∑    Topic sentence
∑    Supporting sentences
∑    Purpose and audience
∑    Sentence combining and coherence

24.    Compose descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive essays.
    

25.    Compose and present in many forms using different techniques for various audiences and occasions both formal and informal.

Examples:    speeches, plays, research reports, business letters, forms, spontaneous response writing

26.    Participate in presentations of written material.
    
Examples:    plays, student writings, improvisational poetry, written communications, debates

27.    Express personal feelings, opinions, and information in formal and informal situations.

Student Characteristics

High school students experience significant growth and development as they assume more complex responsibilities such as working and making career choices.  They are defining their unique voices and making important life decisions.  These students are developing and practicing leadership and interpersonal communication skills in their schools and communities that will facilitate their entrance into adulthood.  They continue to experience physical and emotional change as well as to seek opportunities to develop their independence and individuality.  

Because of the cultural and ideological diversity in a technologically advanced global society, many students have opportunities to interact with others whose backgrounds are different from their own.  Students need to develop their ability to respect differences and to develop literacy skills necessary for becoming productive adults.

Instructional Environment

When high school teachers create classroom communities defined by equity and excellence for all students, all students learn.  These conditions are achieved when teachers hold high expectations for all students regardless of their linguistic, religious, ethnic, or cultural backgrounds and create authentic learning activities that integrate literacy skills.  Effective teachers use a variety of teaching strategies to accommodate individual learning styles.  Projects, mini-lectures, demonstrations, and cooperative small groups are some of the strategies that best facilitate studentsí acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to become lifelong learners and effective communicators.  In addition to traditional assessment tools, English teachers use current research-based methods to measure authentically what students know and are able to do.  These methods include informal and formal observations, performance assessments, and student portfolios.

Scope of Content

High school students use literacy skills as tools for learning across all content areas.  The content of this document calls for ample opportunities for students to become effective language users by developing a knowledge base, building a repertoire of strategies, and applying these strategies in various contexts.  Integrating the strands of listening, reading, viewing, writing, speaking, and presenting into meaningful activities provides opportunities for students to obtain and communicate information, to respond to literature, to use language for learning and reflecting, and to apply critical and creative thinking as they solve problems.

The division of the content into standards that support the comprehension goal, the expression goal, and both goals should provide assistance to English teachers as they plan literacy activities that develop expression and comprehension skills and as they assess student progress.  Key components of the senior high curriculum are knowing and applying language concepts and conventions, reading and writing for a variety of purposes, and using technology in the research process.

Literature

Literature studied in Grades 9-12 represents rich literature traditions around the world.  This literature provides both mirrors from which students can see their life experiences reflected and windows through which they can see and understand the lives of people different and distant from themselves.  Reading a broad range of texts from different genres, from various time periods, and from diverse perspectives allows students to build a better understanding of themselves, of others, and of the world in which they live.

To ensure that students experience high-quality representative literature, the following sequence is provided:  ninth-graders study a broad range of multicultural world literature; tenth-graders study early American literature to 1900 and related world literature; eleventh-graders study American literature from 1900 to the present; and twelfth-graders study British literature.

Literature    Social Studies Courses
∑    World literature∑    A Shakespearean drama, usually Romeo and Juliet    9th    World History and Geography Since 1500
∑    American literature to 1900∑    Related world literature∑    A Shakespearean drama, usually Julius Caesar    10th    United States History and Geography:Beginnings to 1900
∑    American literature, 1900 to the present    11th    United StatesHistory and Geography:  1900 to the Present
∑    British literature∑    A Shakespearean drama, usually Macbeth    12th    American Government and Principles of Economics



Ninth Grade




N
inth-graders are moving from an environment that is exploratory in nature to one that requires them to approximate more closely adult behaviors and perspectives.  They require assistance in making this adjustment that includes developing a more precise vocabulary for effective speaking and
writing.  High school freshmen, as comprehenders of language, may at times prefer literature that primarily provides entertainment.  These same students may also seek texts that challenge them and extend their critical thinking skills.  While these young readers are capable of literary criticism, they need teacher assistance in moving from purely personal reactions to those based on critical principles.  Mastery of basic literary vocabulary and repeated focus on critical principles are essential as students gain author control when writing responses to serious literature.

In expressing themselves through language, students continue to use simple, well-practiced patterns or modes and gain experience in more complex and less familiar forms.  The teacher of such students must be sensitive to their need for encouragement and coaching in exploring mature means of expression appropriate for adult-level writing, speaking, and presenting.  The experiences that teachers provide greatly influence student progress toward becoming lifelong readers and appreciators of language and literature.

MINIMUM REQUIRED CONTENT

9th GRADE

Students will
1.    Apply strategies to interpret textual, functional, and recreational written materials.
    

Examples:    applying prior knowledge, noting organizational pattern, determining sequence of events, determining cause and effect, noting important details, drawing conclusions about main idea

2.    Exhibit the habit of reading for a substantial amount of time daily, including assigned and self-selected materials at their independent and instructional levels.
    

3.    Demonstrate reading improvement gained through substantial amounts of daily reading.
    

4.    Recognize cultures and genres represented in selections from world literature.
    
Example:    Japanese poetry identified by characteristics


5.    Recognize the styles of commonly anthologized authors of world literature.
    
∑    Standard usage versus dialect
∑    Length and complexity of sentences
∑    Diction
∑    Literary devices
Examples:    personification, onomatopoeia, flashbacks

6.    Determine the literary elements in specific works.
    
∑    Plot
∑    Tone
∑    Mood
∑    Character
∑    Setting
∑    Theme

7.    Critique literature, student writing, and various presentations.

8.    Determine when argument and propaganda are used in written, oral, and visual forms.
    

∑    Fact versus opinion
∑    Appeal to emotion

9.    Determine levels of usage.    
∑    Formal
∑    Informal

10.    Recognize that language changes and develops.
    
∑    Etymology
∑    Connotation
∑    Technology
∑    Multicultural contexts

11.    Select and indicate preferences for various forms of communication.
    
Examples:    magazines, Internet, movies, how-to books and videos, drama, biographies, documentaries

12.    Practice listening and viewing skills in a variety of situations.
    
∑    Interpersonal communications
∑    Lectures
∑    Small- and large-group settings
∑    Multimedia presentations

13.    Employ study skills effectively.
    
∑    Taking accurate notes
∑    Transferring and correlating information
∑    Using table of contents and index
∑    Using mnemonic devices
∑    Skimming and scanning
∑    Outlining
∑    Using graphic organizers

14.    Ask appropriate questions in search of information.
    

15.    Synthesize information for reports.
    
∑    Taking notes
∑    Matching ideas
∑    Contrasting ideas
∑    Paraphrasing
∑    Summarizing

16.    Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
    
Examples:    dictionary, thesaurus, atlas, almanac, cataloging systems, readerís guide, encyclopedia, vertical file, reference books, computerized data, electronic text

17.    Conduct individual research using all aspects of the research process.

∑    Managing information
Examples:    locating, selecting, retrieving, evaluating
∑    Documenting information
Example:    correct use of copyrighted materials
∑    Organizing information
Examples:    choosing presentation method, following a style sheet
∑    Presenting information
Examples:    formal written reports, projects

18.    Demonstrate responsible use of othersí ideas.
    
∑    Documenting sources when quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing
∑    Using facts from common knowledge

19.     Demonstrate proficiency with available technology and software in the oral communication, research, and writing processes.
    

Examples:    word processors, facsimile machines

20.    Evaluate personal style in approaching the reading and writing processes using teacher and peer feedback.
    

21.    Write using the principal characteristics of an authorís style.

Example:    organizing an original poem with Emily Dickinsonís simplicity

22.    Demonstrate personal style and voice through writing poetry and prose.

23.    Write in a variety of modes for different purposes and audiences.
    
∑    Modes
-    Description
-    Narration
-    Exposition
-    Persuasion
∑    Purposes
-    Entertainment
-    Information
-    Persuasion
∑    Audiences
Examples:    peers, teachers, parents, local organizations, prospective employers

24.    Use a variety of sentence structures in writing.
    
Example:    combinations of simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex

25.    Organize paragraphs in a variety of patterns.

Examples:    chronological order, cause and effect, order of importance

26.    Write to clarify ideas and organize thinking.
    
Example:    spontaneous response writing

27.    Respond to argument.
    
Examples:    informal debate, letters to the editor

28.    Produce a final draft by using the writing process with peer and teacher assistance.

∑    Prewriting
∑    Drafting
∑    Revising
∑    Editing*
∑    Publishing



*See content standard 29 for specific concepts.

29.    Demonstrate understanding of language terms and ability to apply the concepts to writing.
    

∑    Capitalization
-    Proper nouns and adjectives
-    Regions of the country
-    Courtesy titles
-    Videos, paintings, and other works of art
∑    Punctuation
-    Commas for items in a series, direct address, compound sentences, friendly letter salutations, addresses, nonrestrictive appositives and phrases, introductory adverb clauses, and direct quotations
-    Periods for abbreviations
-    Underlining or italicizing for certain titles
-    Quotation marks for certain titles
-    Quotation marks with direct quotations
-    Colons
-    Semicolons
-    Apostrophe for possession and contractions
∑    Grammar, usage, and spelling
-    Singular, plural, and possessive noun forms
-    Singular and plural verb forms
-    Subject-verb agreement
-    Pronoun-antecedent agreement
-    Avoidance of double negatives, fragments, run-ons, on-and-ons, comma splices, and homonym confusion
-    Appropriate subordination
-    Placement of modifiers
-    Pronoun case, number, and gender
-    Tense
-    Parallel structure

30.    Discuss approaches to grammar and conventions as used in literature.
    

31.    Produce effective oral presentations through use of tone, inflections, and tempo.

Examples:    recitations, book reports, debates, summaries

32.    Vary the formality and precision of spoken language to suit different situations.
    
Examples:    formal class discussions, prepared presentations, impromptu speeches, informal small-group interaction

33.    Display self-confidence in speaking.
    
Examples:    answering questions when called upon, voluntarily asking and answering questions, reading oneís own writing to peers, presenting results from research

34.    Display an extended vocabulary in writing, speaking, and presenting.

∑    Synonyms
∑    Antonyms
∑    Affixes and base words
∑    Classification
∑    Context clues
∑    Denotation and connotation

    



Lesson Plans for week of August 15-19:


Cos Objectives for week:

ASHGE objectives for week:

SAT 10 Objectives for week:

Description of writing objectives for week:


MONDAY 8/15

DOL:  Students correct these when walking in.
5.  The Childrens Aid Society shipped thousands of childs to the midwest and west.

6.  Yes Charles Brace thought that raiseing them children in gooder environments was important.

New Vocab Words for test on Thursday:
1.  Artifact
2.  Curator
3.  Exhibition
4.  Archive
5.  Gallery
6.  Escalate
7.  Sanctions
8.  Arbitration
9.  Summit
10.  Accord

I give the definitions to the students.  For homework they must use them and spell them correctly in sentences.  The test on Thursday will consist of me calling out the word.  The student must use them and spell them correctly in a sentence.

Activities for Monday:
1.  DOL
2.  Vocab test.
3.  Paragraph about a person for writing portfolio.
4.  Revisit prepositions using "Hole on a Log in the Bottom of the Sea" song.
5.  Notes about prepositions and their importance.
6.  Get new vocab words. Homework:  Use them in a sentence.

TUESDAY 8/16
DOL:
7.  A ad appeared in the daily record ou newspaper, before the orphan train's arrival.

8.  In dowagiac Michigan forty seeven children found new homes in a single week.

Activities for Tuesday:
1.  DOL
2.  Notes about prepositions and their importance.
3.  Excersies picking out prepositions from grammar book.  (I do, we do, they do).
7.  Make a poster using a sentence with a preposition and illustrate it for grammar portfolio.

WEDNESDAY 8/17
DOL:  
9.  Les Said "Some of the children led normal, pleasant lifes with their new families.

10.  Other children however were mistreated: some were overworked others were even beaten.

Activities for Wednesday:
1.  DOL
2.  Test on prepositions.
3.  Write a paragraph describing a person.

Thursday 8/18
DOL:
1.  "Whom was Mrs. Jack" uncle Hector asked me?
2.  "Mrs Jack" i said, "was the nickname of Isabella Stewart Gardner, an unusual and lovly woman."

Activities for Thursday:
1.  DOL
2.  Vocab/DOL  test.  
3.  Proofread/peer edit paragraphs about a person.  
4.  Send rubric home for someone else to proofread papers and sign at bottom.

FRIDAY 8/19

DOL:
3.  After her husbands death, mrs. Gardner assembled a pricless collection of paintings statues and other works of art.
4.  I said, "we can see these next june at the Isabella stewart gardner museum in Boston Massachusetts."

Activities for Friday:
1.  DOL
2.  Get new vocab words.
3.  Begin work with nouns.  Take good notes because you may use them on the test!
4.  Turn in Person Paraggraph.
5.  Spend time organizing notebooks.

8/22
Activities for Monday:
1.  DOL
2.  Paragraph describing an abstract noun for writing portfolio.
3.  Continue work with nouns.  Use children's book entitled The Salamander Room to introduce.
4.  Grammar activities and notes with nouns.  Also point out their correlation with prepositional phrases.  Point out the need to learn them as well as prepositions to assist in locating subjects later.
5.  I do, we do, they do activities with nouns from Grammar book.
6.  Make a poster using a sentence with one or more nouns.  Illustrate it for grammar portfolio.
7.  Homework--Make sentences with vocab.

TUESDAY 8/23
DOL:  

Activities for Tuesday:
1.  DOL
1b.  CHECK HOMEWORK!!
2.  Review nouns and prepositons.
3.  Take first short quiz on nouns.  Students may use their notes.

Wednesday 8/24
DOL:
1.  
Activities for Wednesday:
1.  DOL
2.  Correct abstract noun paragraphs.
3.  Review all parts of speech studied thus far.  
4.  Pronoun test.

THURSDAY 8/25

5.  Begin work with pronouns.  Introduce with song "Battlefield."
6.  Give notes and complete activities with pronouns.  I do, we do, they do.
7.  Make a poster using a sentence with one or more pronouns.  Illustrate it for grammar portfolio.
8.  Proofread abstract noun paper and have signed.
Activities for Thursday:
1.  DOL
2.  Spelling/Vocab test.
3.  DOL test

8/26
Activities for Friday:

1.  Make a poster using a sentence with one or more pronouns.  Illustrate it for grammar portfolio.
2.  Proofread abstract noun paper and have signed.
Activities for Thursday:
3.  DOL

8/29
1.  DOL
2.  Get new vocab.  Define them and use them in a sentence.
3.  Complete final drafts on paper decribing a person.

8/30
1.  DOL
2.  Finish pronouns.
3.  Complete final draft of paper describing an abstract noun.
8/31
1.  Introduce adjectives with book I Love You Stinky Face.
2.  Complete activities with adjectives.
3.  Write and illustrate 2 example sentences for grammar portfolio.

9/1
1. DOL  
2.  Review all parts of speech thus far.  Finish pronoun test. Take fourth short quiz on adjectives.  Students may use notes on all grammar quizzes.

9/2
1. DOL
2.  Educational video on the parts of speech.

9/6
DOL:
1.Begin work with verbs.  Use children's book about Santa's workshop  to introduce.
4.  Grammar activities and notes with verbs.  Also review other parts of speech.  Point out the need to learn them for correct writing.
5.  I do, we do, they do activities with verbs from Grammar book.
6.  Make a poster using 2 sentences with one or more verbs.  Illustrate it for grammar portfolio.
7.  Write a definition of a place in a paragraph for writing portfolio.  Must have proofreading sheet signed.
8. Turn in paragraph describing a place for writing portfolio.
9.  Get new vocab/spelling words.

9/7
1.DOL  
2.  Turn in paragraph describing a place for writing portfolio.
3.  I do, we do, they do activities with verbs from Grammar book.
6.  Make a poster using 2 sentences with one or more verbs.  Illustrate it for grammar portfolio.
7.  Write a definition of a place in a paragraph for writing portfolio.  Must have proofreading sheet signed.
8. Turn in paragraph describing a place for writing portfolio.
9.  Get new vocab/spelling words.

9/8
1. DOL
8. Turn in paragraph describing a place for writing portfolio.
9.  Get new vocab/spelling words.

9/9
1.  DOL

  
9/12
1. DOL  
2. Talk about verbs.  Notes on verbs.
3.  Finish unit on verbs.  

9/13
1. Take quiz on verbs.

9/14
1. DOL
2. Begin adverbs.
3. Complete notes on adverbs.
4.  DOL test

9/15
1.  JOurnal entry
2.  Review adverbs.
3.  Do activity togethr with adverbs.
4.  Get new writing assignment.

9/16
5.  Take quiz on adverbs.
6.  Add adverbs with drawings and example sentences to parts of speech portfolio.
7.  Vocab/Spelling quiz.
8.  DOL quiz.

9/19
1.  Journal entry.
2. Begin notes on conjunctions.
3.  Complete activities together on conjunctions.
4.  Add conjunction drawings and example sentences to parts of speech portfolio.
5.  Update writing portfolio.  It should include rough drafts and final copies of the following assignments:  Personal Poster, Paragraph about a person, abstract noun paper, paragraph describing a place.  It should also include a table of contents.
6.  Update parts of s[eech portfolio.  It should include drawings and example sentences of nouns, prepositions, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, and conjunctions.

9/20
1.  Journal entry.
2.  Final test on the parts of speech.

9/21
1.  Journal entry.
2.  Finish final test on parts of speech.
3.  Finish parts of speech portfolio with ALL 8 parts of speech illustrated.
4.  Update writing portfolio.

9/22
1.  Journal entry
2.  9th advanced willl be studying To Kill a Mockingbird.
3.  Begin capitalization actvities.  Work with the 4 types of sentences.  
4.  Begin capitalization project.
5  Spelling/vocab test.

9/23
1. Journal entry.  
2. Turn in parts of speech portfolio.

9/26
1.  DOL
2.  Continue capitalization activities.
3.  9th advanced still studying To Kill a Mockingbird
9/27
1.  DOL
2.  Continue capitalization unit.

9/28
1.  DOL
2.  Shiloh movie.  Mrs. Minor out to attend a workshop.

9/29
1.  DOL
2.  Capitalization unit continued.

9/30
1.  DOL
2.  Capitalization project due.
3.  All DOLS and Journals due.
4.  Finish Shiloh movie.

10/3  Review

10/4  9 weeks test

10/5  Review

10/6  9 weeks test

10/7  Bonus story opportunity for 20 points on 9 weeks test.

10/10-10/14  Fall Break

10/17
1.  DOL
2.  Begin writing express version of Narration.  We may also possibly be studying other punctuation elements this week depending on time.

10/18
1.  DOL
2.  Narration unit

10/19
1.  DOL
2.  Narration unit.

10/20
1. DOL
2. Narration unit.

10/21
1. DOL
2. Narration unit.



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